Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology

Research Article | Open Access

A multi-center, signal-arm study on cancer patients’ perception of chemotherapy side effects, depression, and decision regret at the end of adjuvant treatment

Caterina Calderon1, Raquel Hernández2, David Gómez3, María del Mar Muñoz4, Alba Rosa Díez2, Eva Martínez de Castro5, María Ángeles Vicente6, Laura Ciria-Suarez1, Marta Oporto-Alonso1, Paula Jiménez-Fonseca3

1Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychobiology, Faculty of Psychology. University of Barcelona, Spain.

2Department of Medical Oncology, Hospital Universitario de Canarias, Tenerife, Spain.

3Department of Medical Oncology, Hospital Universitario Central of Asturias, Oviedo, Spain.

4Department of Medical Oncology, Hospital Virgen de La Luz, Cuenca, Spain.

 5Department of Medical Oncology, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Spain.

 6Department of Medical Oncology, Hospital Universitario Morales Meseguer, Murcia, Spain.
Correspondence: Dr. Caterina Calderon ( Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychobiology, Faculty of Psychology, University of Barcelona, Passeig de la Vall d’Hebron, 171. 08035 Barcelona, Spain; Email address: ccalderon@ub.edu).

Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology 2020, https://doi.org/10.32948/ajo.2020.09.22

Received: 01 May 2020 | Accepted: 22 Sep 2020 | Published online: 23 Sep 2020

Abstract

Purpose The aim was to assess patients’ perception of chemotherapy side effects and analyze the relationship between these, depression, and treatment rejection.
Methods A multi-center, signal-arm study in 456 patients with resected, non-metastatic cancer. Conducted upon completion of adjuvant chemotherapy. Participants answered questionnaires evaluating chemotherapy side effects (EORTC-QLC-C30), depression (BSI), and decision regret (DRS).
Results The three most common symptoms reported by the patients were fatigue (57.5%), insomnia (56.7%), and pain (31%). Only 7.6% (n=35) expressed regret over having opted to receive adjuvant chemotherapy. Fatigue, insomnia, dyspnea, and pain were associated with more depression, while fatigue, pain, and age were associated with decision regret.
Conclusion Healthcare professional should consider decreasing fatigue, insomnia, and pain a priority if quality of life is to be improved for patients receiving chemotherapy. The treatment of the side effects of chemotherapy for cancer is essential to improve the quality of life and compliance with the treatment.

Key words adverse events, adjuvant therapy, anticancer drugs, EORTC-QLC-C30, fatigue, toxicity